Chaos Psychology

  • The biopsychosocial model as proposed by George Engel models trajectories of biological and social wholes. Biologically, the causal chain contains molecule, organelle, cell, tissue, organ (system), nerves (system) and person. Socially, this person participates in two-person interacts, family, community, culture, society and biosphere. However, the psychological axis of the person is reduced to “experience and behavior”. I suggest that there is a causal chain along the psychological trajectory missing that is independent of the other two.

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  • Anaf, Baum, Newman, Ziersch and Jolley (2013) researched the “consequences of job loss for retrenched workers’ mental health,” (p. 1). Drawing from their discussion of mental health consequences in the light of structure and agency theory and starting with a methodological critique, this article discusses their findings in the light of attitude and attribution, developing perspectives on subsequent research.

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  • Employees at Deutsche Telekom/T-Systems were undergoing prolonged periods (several months) of job insecurity after having preliminarily been selected into groups with quotas for retrenchment during annual waves of mass-layoffs. Prolonged uncertainty, owing to organizational and legal constraints, placed considerable strain on the emotional experience and mental well-being of the employees …

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  • Buddhism cherishes its Three Jewels, which are keys on the path to enlightenment. They are the Buddha (a particular sublte, centered experience of self), the Sangha (the spiritual community), and the Dharma (the spiritual path and practice together with its knowledge).

    Modern Psychology pursues a tripartite model of attitude change, that is mediators that facilitate an internal, cognitive reconstruction (adaption): consistent or favourable evaluation of self, satisfactory relationships with other people, and informational accuracy (know-how). Attitude change is key to changes dealing with emotional facticism, or samsaric roots …

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  • People who cherish authoritarian values or celebrate hierarchies appear to be on the rise. In corporations, in spite of the 90s and 2000s management literature hierarchies have never really been given up. The law requires those units to be hierarchies by definition, because it wants one person to be blamed for it all. A culture of blame is tightly tied to hierarchies and authoritarian behavior. As is mythical-religious thinking. But why does it appear to stick around and prevail?

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