Chaos Psychology

  • A connection between the gut microbiome and psychological phenomena has long been suggested. In their landmark studies, Thaiss et al. displayed the role of gut microbiome changes on post-dieting weight gain as well as diurnal rhythmicity. Probiotic supplements ar a new trend, but the composition of the gut microbiome is complex, as is the composition of the products. …

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  • The first theory to dismantle with the help of patterns of chaos science is E. Tory Higgins’ theory of self-discrepancy and regulatory fit. The theory is described in detail in Higgins (1987, 1997, 2000). The following figure shows a simplified, systematic overview over the theory. Both dynamics of Higgins’ preventive and preventive behaviour can be modelled as attractors or repulsors. They are extremes on a discrete-looped spectrum of phase transitions …

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  • Psychological phenomena, to great certainty, emerge from the underlying biology of the brain. The brain is a vastly complex, looped network with many levels of internal closure and external open and closed loops. Therefore, any psychological phenomenon is likely to show the properties of emergent phenomena. It is thus necessary to examine psychological theories regarding their epistemological assumptions, whether they base on category/hierarchy (linear-discrete), probabilistic (linear-continuous), homeostatic (looped-continuous), and morphogenetic (looped-discrete). The following slide illustrates the concept:

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  • Highly interesting study from Gominak (2016):

    “Vitamin D deficiency changes the intestinal microbiome reducing B vitamin production in the gut. The resulting lack of pantothenic acid adversely affects the immune system, producing a “pro-inflammatory” state associated with atherosclerosis and autoimmunity”

    This study followed 1000 patients over the course of 6 years, and linked (necessary) vitamin D substitution and changed gut microbiome with a theoretically rare decline in panthotenic acid (B5).

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  • Thinking of organizations and meditating might not recall very similar pictures to most minds. When thinking of organizations, many people will probably dream of process diagrams and move along in an engineering school of thought. Whereas meditation seems to be the epitome of non-thinking, let alone rational thinking (sometimes, cynically, that is attributed to organizations too). However considering the underlying mechanisms both methods show striking similarities. To take this even further: Meditation does to your mind what a good strategist does to an organization because both imply modifying loops of mutual causation.

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