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  • Many attempts at a definition of servant-leadership have been made. Whereas one big problem in organisations nowadays is the question whether leaders should be turned into servants, Greenleaf’s original work took the complementary perspective of the servant as a leader (1977). Although servant-leadership descriptions display typical transformational qualities, i.e., transforming the team into ever better versions of itself, it is sometimes separated in that it shifts attention from the organisational objectives and processes towards the people (Dutta & Khatri, 2017), or takes an indirect approach at achieving organisational objectives through development (and service to) the people (Hall, 1991, Northhouse, 2004, Stone et al., 2004). Servant-Leadership is frequently mentioned in the context of agile methodology and an agile mindset. The connection between the three terms deserves closer examination. Within the multitude of explanation approaches, two links emerge between servant-leadership and the agile mindset: the focus on individual agency and being based on principles, values, and beliefs.

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  • Here’s a small situational analysis that came up in a game, but so reminded me of what is wrong with our businesses.

    Assume you’re in a roleplay game. Assume you have an armada of spaceships. That armada flies in groups. One squad of destroyers, one squad of big tanky battleships, one squad of support ships. They fly missions. You join a couple of these missions in different squads and observe that there is one important ingredient missing: teamwork.

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  • When mapping time-to-market and quality-of-service as independent dimensions, it becomes obvious that there is something lacking in our language, that is detrimental to the success of any transition to agility. What do we really need to get past the bi-modal model of IT?

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  • The Huffington Post today raised an interesting question about ethics, asking whether white supremacists should be able to practice law, or whether the profession should eliminate people “who aren’t morally fit”. I suggest that the problem is a deeper one, one that lies in the fine distinction between morals and ethics. We should have transcended moral-based judgments. Since the rise of the governance wave pretty much every professional organisation comes with a code of ethics. However, recently, a backlash emerged that put financial optimisation back on top of the agenda, along with moral-based evaluation.

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  • Scriptures like the Bible or the Qur’an have little to offer for the atheist scientist. The atheist scientist has completely stopped to ask “Why?” questions and finds delight in investigating “How?” things work. He knows emergence, butterfly effects, how complexity may arise from almost nothing, and does not need transcendental explanations for human complexity or afterlife.

    However, what has science to offer to people who did not give up “Why?” questions?

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